What would you compromise for your fishing?

What are you willing to compromise to keep your fishing the way it is?

We posted here a few weeks ago about a changing climate.

“Sooner or later, anyone who enjoys trout fishing has to wonder: “What if the summers do keep getting hotter? Will the fishing get worse? Is this still going to be a trout stream in 20 or 30 years? Or should I start practicing my Bassmaster cast?” ”

Lets hope to keep the Bassmaster at bay for awhile longer. The truth is, as anglers, we have a lot to lose in the face of such change, a truth we don’t always acknowledge head on.

While the people at TU are tackling these changes in a number of direct ways, we’re also looking ahead. According to the EPA, fossil fuels used for electricity accounted for 40 percent of this country’s carbon dioxide emissions in the last decade - the largest single source. If we want to reduce the amount of carbon we put into the atmosphere, renewable energy will have to be part of our path forward.

But before we start putting wind towers and solar panels on every open piece of public land, we need to stop and think for a moment.

Which is where a bill re-introduced by the Senate this week comes in. To do renewable energy the right way - the sustainable and smart way - this bill could be the answer.

The Public Lands Renewable Energy Development Act would create a sensible direction forward for renewable energy. It puts money back into the pockets of hunters and anglers by creating a fund that would go directly to conservation. Among other things, it also puts royalty money in the pockets of counties and states, dollars I’m sure many a county commissioner could use in their bottom line.

There’s no doubt large-scale renewable energy will have some impact on our access to public lands. But that’s where the compromise comes in. If we do nothing to reduce our footprint, we stand to lose much more. And if we aren’t proactive about how renewables are developed, we may not like the outcome.

A bill like this would be revolutionary for western landscapes. If you’ve watched oil and gas unfold over the past few decades, you know the price sportsmen have had to pay hasn’t been cheap. And that’s not something we’re looking to replicate.

As far as compromises go, this seems like a pretty good one.

 

 

Comments

 
said on Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

I'm not convinced about man's influence on Planet Earth's climate, except for programs like HAARP. The imposed regulations demanding compromise won't be in the interest of environment in the end, but will be for power for deceiving elitists interests, i.e. the new money being carbon vouchers. Every "global warming" "expert" speaking for these draconian regulations are tied in some way to grant making institutions connected to the globalist power clubs. I believe these land and water issues are best left to the individual States which will deal with them. If you are a credible trout fly fisherman, surely a bass cast will be easy enough! You guys rock! I love your site.

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said on Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

"...renewable energy will have to be part of our path forward." You are so right. But solar energy is still in its infancy. It will go a long way in helping to achieve the goals for the environment you are hoping for. Solar panels don't have to dominate everything, but they can be huge in supplying energy. They could help free up other sources for industry by being the main source for residential use.

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said on Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

As a member of an eastern Washington fly club and a life long outdoorsman I am pretty sure we could do more to help. But I also believe that we who live in the pacific northwest are by and large very considerate of our economy in general compared to some other parts of the country. Our wind turbin sites are constantly growing and with our hydro power and nuclear as well we could be doing some solar research in the future but I think our people are trying to stay abreast of the technology. I actually dont think compromise is quite the proper way I would put it. We should not have to compromise our beliefs if we do the right things to begin with. One of the biggest threats that could be dealt with much better is the runoff from the pulpmills that are up and down the Columbia River and Snake River system. I have been on site in most of them and their chemical leaks, spills and bad drains and valves are dealt with only as a last resort usually only at shutdowns.

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said on Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

Every year I see my home waters in Montana getting warmer earlier. The runoff is coming out at ever changing times. On the Yellowstone we have already lost 20 miles of consistently cold water habitat at furthest downstream reaches. As sportsmen, we need to come to grips that we might have to make some sacrifices by seeing another wind farm or solar array. I remember when the fight was to keep cows off federal lands because they were trashing our streams until someone realized that by loosing federal grazing leases, ranchers were being forced to sell our valley floors for condos. We got smart and decided "cows not condos" was a better direction. Now, after years of improving grazing practices, we have ranches, rivers and yes cows, and thank goodness fewer condos! I believe renewable energy should be treated the same way. We need it now.

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said on Thursday, February 14th, 2013

Carbon fuels have reached a point where they hurt more than help. We can do nothing about the past now, but there is still some time to do something about the future.

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said on Thursday, February 14th, 2013

The argument as to whether climate change is man induced or not is inconsequential. According to the best scientist and science in the world, you remember those guys? Yeah the ones who created this internet and software we are using right now, and the same ones who put us on the moon and developed the stealth technology that killed Bin Laden. Well, scientist using the same scientific method just released reports quoted by J. Marshall Shepherd, president of the American Meteorological Society and director of the atmospheric sciences program at the University of Georgia. Even if climate change were a natural cycle, there is absolutely no doubt that the green house gases that we are releasing now are vastly increasing the probability of the natural warming being extreme and occurring at an ever increasing rate. Folks can choose to ignore science, but that does not change the truth. If we want our kids to be able to enjoy cold water fisheries, we need to reduce our carbon output. Until science discovers a new energy source and it undoubtedly will, this means we need more renewable energy

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