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KQED Nes - The California Report
By Molly Peterson
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

“The challenges we have here are because we’ve promised too much water to too many people,” says Trout Unlimited’s Chrysten Lambert. “We’ve promised more water than there is here.”

KQED News - The California Report
By Molly Peterson
Tuesday, November 22, 2016

[I]n Oregon, Trout Unlimited’s Chrysten Lambert says restoration projects are already working.

“We definitely see responses in the native fish populations when we remove passage barriers, when we decrease temperature and when we restore complexity of habitat to provide them with important areas we need for spawning and rearing,” she says. “We do see responses in the native fish populations oftentimes immediately from that.”

Lambert also works with private landowners to modify land use to minimize nutrient runoff. With help from her organization, some ranchers have put up fencing to keep cattle from wandering into and damaging streams. Keeping cattle out also helps the recovery of streamside vegetation that helps filter pollutants.

Salt Lake Tribune
By Tom Wharton
Monday, November 28, 2016

Non-native fish have been removed from Mill Creek in Salt Lake County and replaced by native fish such as Bonneville cutthroat, mountain suckers and long nosed dace.

Brian Anderson, vice chair of conservation for the Utah Council of Trout Unlimited, reported that the removal of a small dam and subsequent restoration of the creek channel through the dam site ended a four-year project.

Volunteers from Trout Unlimited recently released nearly 9,000 Bonneville cutthroat trout — the Utah State fish — into the urban canyon creek.
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Anderson said that was the third and final stocking of the cutthroats.

Trout Unlimited worked with the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, PaciCorp, private landowners and the Boy Scouts of America on the project.

Anderson reported that anglers have been catching the cutthroats that were planted earlier.

Valley Courier News (Alamosa, Colorado)
By Ruth Heide
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Finding more water in the wintertime would bolster the fish population, "because we have close to gold medal quality fisheries in the upper Conejos," Terry said.

AmmoLand
Friday, November 11, 2016

“Public land wind and solar development offers the prospect of energy security and cleaner, more sustainable sources of energy. If done responsibly, this development can coexist with our outdoor traditions,” says Corey Fisher, senior policy director for Trout Unlimited’s Sportsmen’s Conservation Project. “The BLM rule is a good start for finding that balance, but we also need Congress to pass the Public Lands Renewable Energy Development Act and ensure that there is dedicated funding for improving fish and wildlife habitat in areas affected by development. Doing so will help to offset some of the unavoidable impacts and help ensure that the BLM’s new leasing rule is implemented successfully.”

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