Chris Wood's posts

About Chris Wood

Before coming to Trout Unlimited in September 2001, Chris Wood served as the senior policy and communications advisor to the Chief of the U.S. Forest Service where he helped protect 58 million acres of publicly ... Read more about Chris Wood

From Bristol Bay to the Bronx

Washington, D.C., is a long way from Dillingham, Alaska, but that’s where Triston Chaney spent his 19th birthday. Triston was among a group of commercial fishermen, lodge owners and outfitters who came back to the nation’s capital to discourage the EPA from permitting the proposed Pebble Mine in southwest Alaska. Over birthday cake at our … Read more

Making a good fishery great

The Upper D could be the heartbeat of the region’s economy Lee Hartman showed up in 1973, a decade after the Cannonsville Reservoir went into service on the West Branch of the Upper Delaware River to help supply water to New York City. Lee’s habit was to take a few days every year, and mark a space on the map to camp and fish for trout. His … Read more

Hope for Idaho’s Salmon

“I have concluded that I am going to stay alive long enough to see salmon return to healthy populations in Idaho.” Those words by U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho) at a conference at the Andrus Center last week may do more to project the recovery of the imperiled Snake River salmon and steelhead than multiple … Read more

Why is it important that we recover southwestern trout?

Jim looked at me in disbelief. “What?” I repeated my question, “Why is it important that we recover southwestern native trout?” “Let me tell you a story,” he said. Jim Brooks was the longtime lead of the Gila Trout recovery team. Gila trout are native to the tributaries of the Gila River in New Mexico … Read more

Helping the Wood River to breathe

The room is full for the banquet. I first came across the Narragansett chapter of Trout Unlimited seven or eight years ago, when a few frustrated members contacted me and complained that the chapter was assisting the state in stocking over native fish in violation of TU policy. After a time, the chapter stopped, but … Read more

The time for band-aids is past

Make no mistake, we will double down on making communities and landscapes more resilient to the effects of climate change, and do so in a way that benefits wild and native coldwater fisheries and their watersheds. At the same time, we will work very hard with our many partners and members and supporters to pass federal legislation that slows the causes of climate change.