Alaska TU leaders on public lands: Be an advocate

Explorers, hunters, anglers, hikers, climbers, campers and s’mores artists alike benefit from the bounty of Alaska’s public lands for some of our best memories, the fullness of our chest freezers, or our most engaging tales of misadventure. As such, we assume the responsibility of being active stewards of the land and ethical facilitators when introducing new participants to pursuits on our national commons.

A milestone in native trout recovery

Paiute cutthroat are often called the rarest trout in North America. Their historic range is an 11-mile long stretch of a single creek in the eastern Sierra Nevada near the California-Nevada border. The population of this singular trout, with its unique purplish hue and markings, succumbed to a variety of factors over the past century, … Read more

Murkowski gives Pebble a stern warning with submitted report language

After issuing a harsh warning to the Army Corps of Engineers at a Bristol Bay salmon event last week, Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski followed up by introducing report language in to the Senate Appropriations committee yesterday morning that called on the Corps to make significant changes to Pebble’s Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

Corridors paved with water

A view of the mountains in New Mexico.

When teaching guide clients how to read a stream, I stressed three basic conditions that dictate where a trout will hold: access to food, access to safety and access to shelter from energy-sapping currents. A healthy and stable abundance of any or all of these conditions affords trout the option of staying put, perhaps enabling … Read more

Best. Idea. Ever.

By Corey Fisher Over four decades ago Congress declared that “it is the policy of the United States that…the public lands be retained in Federal ownership”. These words were part of the Federal Lands Management Policy Act of 1976 and they marked a point in our nation’s history in which public lands – the 640 million acres of … Read more

Getting out there

Creek crossing.

Allegra, Grant and I emerged from the densely wooded trail, stepping out onto the wooden bridge for our first view of Resurrection Bay. Mountains jutted up from the water as the evening sun shone through Tonsina Creek valley, and ravens flew overhead. Spawning silver and chum salmon pooled up in riffles below us, and our noses filled with the decaying fish that came before them, soon to be the ravens’ feast.

Alaska’s Eklutna River, just add water

As an angler, this is where the problem sinks in. It’s a visible focal point for the issue at hand. On one side, a massive freshwater lake, on the other, a salmon stream that once supported all 5 species of Pacific Salmon sits bone dry.