Isonychia Parachute

I’m less than a week away from a much-anticipated trip to Argentina, where I’ll be fishing the country’s northern Patagonia region. When I arrive, summer will be on the horizon, and bigger mayflies will be in my fly box. Tim Flagler ties an excellent big mayfly pattern—size 12—in his Isonychia Parachute pattern, a dependable dry … Read more

Lake trout on the decline in Yellowstone Lake

National Park Service removed more than 280,000 invasive fish in 2019 Yellowstone National Park and its crews of contracted gillnetters removed 282,960 invasive lake trout from Yellowstone Lake this summer, a slight dip from previous years, and a likely indication that overall lake trout numbers are shrinking.  Nevertheless, there remains work to be done to … Read more

Faith

Fly fishing in New Mexico.

I was driving home the other morning from my son’s school, where a prospective head of school had fielded questions from an auditorium full of parents. One father had asked how the candidate would promote critical thinking in an environment so well known for its “indoctrination” of our nation’s youth. He seemed to accept this reality, yet expressed hope that debate would be encouraged on controversial topics. One of them, no surprise, was … Read more

The RS2

For you masochistic anglers out there who actually enjoy fishing tiny emerger patterns, this one’s for you. (And, yes, on occasion, I’m one of you. Insert face-palm emoji here). The RS2, which stands for Rim’s Semblance 2, is one of the most effective small emerger flies ever crafted—it can be absolutely deadly in the fall … Read more

Icy Hot Jig

Winter flies that work dependably often don’t look like anything found naturally in the water. For instance, I do really well using a size 12 Prince Nymph here in eastern Idaho, where winter fishing is doable on a few local rivers, like the Bear and the Henry’s Fork. I suppose the Prince might be a … Read more

‘Salmon Forest’ residents won’t be ignored

FishingTongassKayla

Mostly, I felt confident that the U.S. Forest Service would make decisions that benefit, instead of harm, the overall health of fish and wildlife in the Tongass National Forest. That is, until now.