Hiking the CDT: Characters on the trail

Crash and Kiltsman stayed with us for the first day out of town. The year before they had done the Appalachian Trail and they kept telling us it was harder than this trail. Not so much in terms of length but in terms of elevation gain and loss. Kiltsman got his name for the Scottish kilt he wears, no matter the weather.

Hiking the CDT: Cirque de Towers, trout and the desert

The next morning was the day of the Cirque de Towers, a much anticipated hike. We left the trail in the morning and began to climb up to the valley of walls that formed a fortress of cliffs. Apparently, the way into the beautiful valley is called Texas Pass. This climb is much harder than any climb I’ve ever done, and I hope I never have to do one like it again. The trail walks along several lakes as it shallowly climbs up a gorge. But the trail and the gorge both disappear and leave you to make your own short, steep switchbacks straight up to the pass. Over the top you enter the famous valley of Cirque de Towers and drop down all the way to a lake.

Hiking the CDT: Aunt Luchrysta, a bull moose in the river and West Yellowstone

“Up and down. Up and down. Everyday I’m reminded this trail is the CDT, the Continental Divide Trail, and not the Valley trail. The trail does not follow the easiest path south, it follows the mountains that separate the waters of this country. Instead of walking across that valley towards the Tetons, the trail climbs the mountainous hills up to Yellowstone. Though there were animal sightings and incredible views, I still would have preferred to take an easier route.”

Catch the F3T, help a local conservation cause

The Fly Fishing Film Tour is available for online streaming right now, and if you’re interested in catching this year’s film offerings, you can buy tickets from an independent screening and help a local conservation cause in the process. So far, the F3T has raised more than $30,000 for local conservation causes via independent screenings. … Read more

Hiking the CDT: Road-walking to Canada with grizzly bears

Our best grizzly sighting happened on the last day just 8 miles from the border. We were excited and walking fast. My cousin Ethan was walking ahead and staring at his phone. He apperantly did not notice the bear walking up the road. After we caught his attention, his first thought, he later told us, was “Oh cool, a bear.” Followed shortly by, “Oh crap, a bear!”