The cruelest month

Biggest fish of the day, general trout season opener, Los Padres Reservoir, April 2019. April is the cruellest [sic] month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. Thus begins The Waste Land, T.S. Elliot’s most famous work and the defining poem of the Modernist era … Read more

Making a good fishery great

The Upper D could be the heartbeat of the region’s economy Lee Hartman showed up in 1973, a decade after the Cannonsville Reservoir went into service on the West Branch of the Upper Delaware River to help supply water to New York City. Lee’s habit was to take a few days every year, and mark a space on the map to camp and fish for trout. His … Read more

The Copper John

The Copper John is one of the most productive nymphs used for searching—this time of year, with runoff-swollen rivers and high, murky water, it’s an excellent option for getting down deep and attracting trout. The fly, originally tied by its namesake, John Barr, isn’t just a high-water fly, either. It’s a quality attractor that possesses … Read more

‘A Nation’s River’ highlights TU’s efforts in the Potomac headwaters

Dustin Wichterman lives trout.  By day he manages Trout Unlimited’s restoration and protection work in the Potomac headwaters.  Most of the rest of the time he’s either fishing for trout or dreaming about fishing for trout.  And a big part of that dream is that one day the Potomac headwaters will again regularly churn out native brook trout pushing … Read more

Spring on Jack Creek

Beyond its confluence with Cow Creek near the village of San Ysidro, the Pecos River’s southward crawl is rarely supplemented by significant inputs other than random flash floods. Deriving its existence from how much snow falls on a mere six percent of its watershed, the Pecos flows most of its length through a desert, which is why I’ve always had difficulty believing that it’s the sixteenth longest river … Read more