How to Read a River

Reading the water is an acquired skill. It’s an ability that’s honed over time, and one that takes into account not only a river’s physical characteristics, but how certain stretches might fish at certain times of the year … or even certain times of the day. Above, RIO’s Simon Gawesworth helps shorten the learning curve, … Read more

How to tie flies with foam

Foam flies revolutionized dry-fly angling a couple of decades ago. Flies that absolutely must float—think grasshoppers, big salmon flies and other terrestrial flies, like ants and beetles—got a big boost from the foam incursion into the fly-tying arena years ago. While foam can be really effective to use in any number of patterns, it can … Read more

Fishing dry flies over gravel runs

Those long, featureless gravel runs that can be found on a lot of western rivers–and freestone rivers throughout the country–might often be trout “dead zones,” but as Orvis’ Dave Jensen points out in the video below, during hatches, these stretches of water can be very productive. Otherwise nondescript habitat, these gravel shelves can be anywhere … Read more

Watch before you fish

You wouldn’t tackle a math problem—even the simplest of equations—without first taking a second to figure out the variables and determining where to start with your efforts to solve it, would you? Now, apply that logic to fly fishing. It’s always a good idea to take a look at a stretch of water, just as … Read more

The Rise of the River Herring

If you ever have doubts that ocean-going fish like shad, herring and salmon can recover with just a little help, take a quick look at the video below, produced by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. In Maine’s Damariscotta River, in the community of Damariscotta Mills, the restoration of a 200-year-old fish ladder has increased … Read more

The Girdle Bug

It’s stonefly season in the West—the big, adult bugs will be popping on a river near you before you know it. And, while the dry-fly imitations are easily the most popular—and the most fun to fish—it’s the nymph patterns that likely catch more trout. And there are some great stonefly nymph patterns out there. But … Read more

Natural vs. Prince

One thing nymph anglers often forget–or may never realize–is that nymphs, particularly if they’re suspended under an indicator or high-sticked through a fishy run, will ride through the water column vertically. The good news is, natural nymphs, when struggling in the current and not able to reconnect to river-bottom stones and rocks or other debris, … Read more