‘Climate change is water change’

Climate change is water change. A warmer climate impacts nearly every facet of the water cycle: increased evaporation and transpiration deplete water from the land, rivers, lakes, oceans, and forests. Warmer air retains more water that is later released through intense precipitation events that are more likely to cause flash flooding and run-off pollution.

Wildfire and climate change in Utah sparks conversation

By Andy Rasmussen This summer Utah has suffered through a near record wildfire season. And residents along the Wasatch Front have been breathing smoke from California’s four million burned acres for the past two months. Catastrophic wildfire on this scale can destroy everything Trout Unlimited works so hard to accomplish. High-country rivers and headwaters can … Read more

Fixing what ails our western forests and communities

The light smoke in Washington, D.C., signaled devastation in the West. In California, for example, at least 26 people have perished from wildfire, and more than 7,000 structures were destroyed. In Oregon, the Almeda fire, alone, destroyed nearly 2,400 homes and killed at least three people, with more missing

COVID-19 closures helped clear the air but crowded fishing parking lots

“The pleasant urban travel experience and clear blue skies I encountered lead me to wonder how much air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions were changing during the quarantine. Drawing from my own expertise as an environmental consultant, I did a little research to figure out how the quarantine was changing things.”

Increases in freshwater insects — an opportunity for hope?

“This information surprised me in some ways. Hearing apocalyptic news seems to happen so often these days, it can be hard to believe, accept, and somehow integrate such information into one’s mind, heart, and daily existence. But more than that, some of the examples given in the article did not necessarily describe what I have seen in my career.”