Author

Helen Neville

  • Conservation

    Love fish? Plant a tree

    Celebrate Arbor Day and support Natural Climate Solutions Way back in 1872, in what was still recognized as the Nebraska Territory, a group of people decided to organize a day of mass tree plantings. Chances are none of them could have realized the much broader significance of this meaningful act and what is has become.   …

  • Science

    Unwrapping genetic gifts that tell meaningful stories of trout

    Lately I’ve been ruminating about why I love genetics, a wonky field of numbers and theory where a true understanding of results only happens long after the field season — in an office, on a computer at that. Every time I get new genetic results it’s like receiving a surprise gift. So many processes — all this history we can’t see — shape the genes of all organisms, including fish. The genetic patterns we uncover, then, tell us real and important things about the conservation needs of these fish. …

  • Dam Removal

    Our failure to remember affects salmon and steelhead conservation

    'The best run in years' doesn't mean things are getting better overall We’ve all heard stories from our grandparents of unbelievable abundance and sizes in their fishing forays — the salmon so numerous it boggled the mind, and those Lahontan cutthroat trout so big you couldn't wrap your arms around them. Yet even with these anecdotes it’s still hard to internalize just how different our experience…

  • Science

    Science leads to credible conservation

    TU staff across the country and our programs utilize science daily As Trout Unlimited has grown and changed, we have been thinking a lot about what science means to our organization.  It is an ever-evolving conversation, partly because we have an ever-growing staff applying science in their work. Whether hired specifically for TU Science or field programs, across the organization we now have, unbelievably, more than 30 staff with significant science backgrounds. We’ve grown…

  • Science

    Barging increases likelihood of hatchery fish straying into wild steelhead populations

    "To repeat the obvious, that means in 2006 an estimated 42 percent of the spawners in this “wild” population were hatchery fish. Statistical modeling indicated the number of steelhead smolts barged in the Snake River in the previous several years was a strong predictor of PHOS (Percent Hatchery Origin Spawners)."

    There may be no more amazing feat in nature than migrations undertaken by salmon as they complete an epic journey from freshwater to the ocean and back upstream to their birthplace to spawn. In some cases, salmon swim more than 1,000 miles upstream to spawning waters. In this final freshwater phase of their trip, adults follow…

  • Conservation

    Removing lower Snake River dams is best chance for salmon, steelhead recovery

    [et_pb_section admin_label="section"] [et_pb_row admin_label="row"] [et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text"] Editor's Note: This opinion piece originally ran in the Idaho Statesman on Nov. 18. In his recent op-ed, Kurt Miller, the executive director of Northwest River Partners, an association of businesses that supports retention of the federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers, argued against removing the…

  • Science

    Lahontan cutthroat a poster child for modeling extinction risk

    Researchers work to gather data on Lahontan cutthroat trout. Jason Barnes/Trout Unlimited Determining the conservation needs of at-risk wildlife species is complicated business. Federal and state wildlife agencies—and their partners — need to assess the unique characteristics of different populations to understand the conservation needs of a given species. They typically ask questions like: “Which…