Author

Mark Taylor

  • Climate Change

    The time for action on climate change is now

    As keen observers of nature and careful students of science, anglers know well that the science of climate change is becoming clearer and more indisputable with each passing year.   As high temperature records continue to fall week after week, month after month and year after year, now is the time for TU’s members and supporters to act.  That's why it's critical to…

  • Conservation

    New TU field techs get to work in Catskills

    Joe Liesman and Chris Pullano recently joined the Trout Unlimited staff for six-month stints as technicians in the Upper Delaware River basin. We recently caught up with the two avid conservationists and anglers to see how things have been going.  Q: Talk a little about your backgrounds. Where did you grow up and what got you interested…

  • Featured

    Tech helps trip-planning, but it’s not fool-proof

    I recently had a video call with a Trout Unlimited volunteer in New York. I couldn’t help being distracted. Over his shoulder I could see a stream in the background. “What river is that?” I asked. “The West Branch of the Delaware,” he replied. “I actually was watching fish rise before this call started.” Oh,…

  • Conservation

    Trout and Salmon Foundation’s grants make out-sized impact for TU

    Small donations from private foundations provide seed money needed to get a big restoration project going

    When Trout Unlimited and the U.S. Forest Service team up for a reconnection project next year in the Ottawa National Forest in Michigan, the price tag will top $80,000.  In terms of the project’s total cost, a single $5,000 contribution might seem like it’s not that big of a deal. But that grant from the…

  • Featured

    Terrestrial bugs offer great dry-fly fishing on small creeks

    Late summer and early fall offer some of the season's best dry-fly fishing on small creeks in the east. This isn't hatch-matching fishing. It's terrestrial season

    Most years, Virginia’s small mountain trout streams have become unfishable trickles by August. This year has been a bit different. Massive rains in May and June meant the streams were in great shape heading into summer’s peak, which was a good thing because July brought record heat and a strange lack of the almost-daily thunderstorms…