Author

Zoe Bommarito

  • Snake River dams

    Fresh support for Snake salmon recovery

    Long-awaited report shows that replacing the dams’ benefits is possible. Change in the Snake basin is inevitable. Since the completion of the four lower Snake dams in 1975, the river’s salmon and steelhead populations have declined by more than 90 percent—to the detriment of tribes, anglers, businesses, and communities across the Northwest. Throwing new momentum…

  • Snake River

    Your Snake Questions – Answered

    Here are six frequently asked questions about taking down the dams and restoring critical populations of wild fish in the Basin.

    We are experiencing some of our worst returns on record for wild salmon and steelhead. Over the past 25 years, the Snake Basin has averaged less than two returning adults for every 100 smolt. Biologists from Oregon and Idaho, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and various tribes estimate that Snake River dam breaching will…

  • Snake River Conservation

    Q&A: 1,000 miles from Source to Sea

    Two paddlers from the Grand Salmon project talk about their upcoming trip, dam removal, and Snake River salmon.

    Libby Tobey and Hailey Thompson are embarking on an incredible trip this summer along with three other athletes and advocates. The women are skiing and paddling over 1,000 miles from central Idaho to the Pacific Ocean as part of a public awareness and advocacy initiative, the “Grand Salmon Source to Sea" project, which aims to…

  • From the field

    Wrestling calves, reconnecting rivers

    TU’s Cory Toye brings people, industry, and agencies together to protect streams and native fish in the Bighorn Basin.  Cory Toye’s birthplace of Meeteetse, Wyoming—population just over 300—is a prime example of Western ranching country. Here, like many rural communities, locals rely on their connections to land and water for their livelihoods. They are ranchers,…

  • From the field

    Future of the Yellowstone

    Winding streams, abundant wildlife, and year-round beauty. The Yellowstone River is as iconic and awe inspiring as it gets. Flowing 660 miles from its origin in Yellowstone National Park to its confluence with the Missouri River, the Yellowstone rises and falls, untamed by any dam. The river is the very essence of wildness, yet it…