Tag

dam removal

  • Snake River dams

    Fresh support for Snake salmon recovery

    Long-awaited report shows that replacing the dams’ benefits is possible. Change in the Snake basin is inevitable. Since the completion of the four lower Snake dams in 1975, the river’s salmon and steelhead populations have declined by more than 90 percent—to the detriment of tribes, anglers, businesses, and communities across the Northwest. Throwing new momentum…

  • Snake River

    Your Snake Questions – Answered

    Here are six frequently asked questions about taking down the dams and restoring critical populations of wild fish in the Basin.

    We are experiencing some of our worst returns on record for wild salmon and steelhead. Over the past 25 years, the Snake Basin has averaged less than two returning adults for every 100 smolt. Biologists from Oregon and Idaho, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and various tribes estimate that Snake River dam breaching will…

  • Snake River Conservation

    Q&A: 1,000 miles from Source to Sea

    Two paddlers from the Grand Salmon project talk about their upcoming trip, dam removal, and Snake River salmon.

    Libby Tobey and Hailey Thompson are embarking on an incredible trip this summer along with three other athletes and advocates. The women are skiing and paddling over 1,000 miles from central Idaho to the Pacific Ocean as part of a public awareness and advocacy initiative, the “Grand Salmon Source to Sea" project, which aims to…

  • Dam Removal

    A watershed moment for the Klamath

    Public comment encouraged, critically low salmon and steelhead runs can’t wait On February 25, the long campaign by TU and our Klamath Tribal and conservation partners to restore the Klamath River passed a major milestone when the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released its draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) on proposed decommissioning of the Lower…

  • Dam Removal

    On the Elwha, dams came down, steelhead came back.

    Wild summer-run steelhead, once prolific in the Elwha, were functionally extinct before the dams were removed. Six years later, they were back.

    Life After Dams Part 1 of a series. This week, we’re telling stories about what happens when dams come out and life flows back in. It’s a vision of what could be on the lower Snake: a free-flowing river and wild fisheries staging a remarkable comeback. It is not always possible to restore wild places…