Tag

science

  • Climate Change

    Action on climate change moving ahead in Washington

    If you ask anglers across America about changes they are observing in their favorite watersheds, it is a safe bet they can share concerning stories. Lower rivers caused by diminished snowpack, less rainfall and more frequent and intense droughts. Basins ravaged by wildfires and hotter summers that routinely elevate river temperatures above levels suitable for trout…

  • Science

    TU’s science programs in Great Lakes keep growing

    By Jake Lemon  Trout Unlimited's team in the Great Lakes region continues to expand on its ambitious science-related initiatives, which are critical in informing protection and restoration projects in the region.  TU continues to support our chapters and partners in enhancing their water monitoring activities with the Mayfly sensor station, a low-cost real-time stream monitoring technology. Developed by Stroud Water…

  • Science

    Unwrapping genetic gifts that tell meaningful stories of trout

    Lately I’ve been ruminating about why I love genetics, a wonky field of numbers and theory where a true understanding of results only happens long after the field season — in an office, on a computer at that. Every time I get new genetic results it’s like receiving a surprise gift. So many processes — all this history we can’t see — shape the genes of all organisms, including fish. The genetic patterns we uncover, then, tell us real and important things about the conservation needs of these fish. …

  • Featured

    Our failure to remember affects salmon and steelhead conservation

    'The best run in years' doesn't mean things are getting better overall We’ve all heard stories from our grandparents of unbelievable abundance and sizes in their fishing forays — the salmon so numerous it boggled the mind, and those Lahontan cutthroat trout so big you couldn't wrap your arms around them. Yet even with these anecdotes it’s still hard to internalize just how different our experience…

  • Science

    ‘Climate change is water change’

    Climate change is water change. A warmer climate impacts nearly every facet of the water cycle: increased evaporation and transpiration deplete water from the land, rivers, lakes, oceans, and forests. Warmer air retains more water that is later released through intense precipitation events that are more likely to cause flash flooding and run-off pollution.

    By Chase S. Whiting As summer transitioned to fall, the sun hung eerily over the Adirondack Mountains and illuminated smoke that traveled some 3,000 miles from wildfires out West. Seeing the smoke reminded me that seemingly distant corners of the planet are in fact interconnected by our shared environment.  In Vermont, the climate change story…

  • Barriers

    Habitat connectivity helps trout take care of themselves

    If we do our part to remove migration obstacles from rivers and streams, the fish will take care of the rest. The benefits could be immeasurable.

    By Brian Hodge In our work at Trout Unlimited, we often rely on scientific theory to plan and implement conservation projects. In some instances, we also test hypotheses by monitoring projects and comparing predictions with outcomes, and in doing so contribute towards the broader body of scientific theory.   For TU and our local agency partners, the…