Currently browsing… science

  • From the President

    From Red Brook to Bristol Bay: scaling conservation

    A few days ago, the people of Wareham, Mass., delivered a victory for conservation. They voted overwhelmingly against the wishes of their town administrator, and four of their five selectmen, and denied a 775-acre development in the headwaters of Red Brook. The development likely would have harmed one of the relatively few remaining populations of…

  • Science Community Featured

    TU’s science programs in Great Lakes keep growing

    By Jake Lemon  Trout Unlimited's team in the Great Lakes region continues to expand on its ambitious science-related initiatives, which are critical in informing protection and restoration projects in the region.  TU continues to support our chapters and partners in enhancing their water monitoring activities with the Mayfly sensor station, a low-cost real-time stream monitoring technology. Developed by Stroud Water…

  • Conservation Featured From the field Restoration Science

    New mapping tool puts beavers to work for Upper Columbia fisheries

    By Crystal Elliot, Kodi Jo Jaspers, and Matt Mayfield  Beavers and trout anglers are not strangers. Many of us have been startled while standing knee-deep in a trout stream when something big and brown and way larger than the fish we are targeting suddenly slips past. Beavers can cause headaches for land managers as they engineer streams and ponds…

  • Science Conservation Featured

    Unwrapping genetic gifts that tell meaningful stories of trout

    Lately I’ve been ruminating about why I love genetics, a wonky field of numbers and theory where a true understanding of results only happens long after the field season — in an office, on a computer at that. Every time I get new genetic results it’s like receiving a surprise gift. So many processes — all this history we can’t see — shape the genes of all organisms, including fish. The genetic patterns we uncover, then, tell us real and important things about the conservation needs of these fish. …

  • Featured Dam Removal steelhead

    Our failure to remember affects salmon and steelhead conservation

    'The best run in years' doesn't mean things are getting better overall We’ve all heard stories from our grandparents of unbelievable abundance and sizes in their fishing forays — the salmon so numerous it boggled the mind, and those Lahontan cutthroat trout so big you couldn't wrap your arms around them. Yet even with these anecdotes it’s still hard to internalize just how different our experience…

  • Science Climate Change

    ‘Climate change is water change’

    Climate change is water change. A warmer climate impacts nearly every facet of the water cycle: increased evaporation and transpiration deplete water from the land, rivers, lakes, oceans, and forests. Warmer air retains more water that is later released through intense precipitation events that are more likely to cause flash flooding and run-off pollution.

    By Chase S. Whiting As summer transitioned to fall, the sun hung eerily over the Adirondack Mountains and illuminated smoke that traveled some 3,000 miles from wildfires out West. Seeing the smoke reminded me that seemingly distant corners of the planet are in fact interconnected by our shared environment.  In Vermont, the climate change story…