Tag

climate change

  • Climate Change Conservation

    Funding the public lands in your backyard

    National Wildlife Refuges are overlooked (and underfunded) gems of America's public lands system. We're working to change that. The U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System offers some of our country’s most accessible recreation, including fishing. While this system of federal public lands received a slight increase in funding this year and the President's budget requests an…

  • Advocacy

    Why the federal budget matters for trout and salmon

    If you're looking for ways to lose your friends’ attention, try mentioning the federal budget.   But the legislation that funds our nation's sprawling government apparatus is vitally important for the lands and waterways that support the country’s water quality, fisheries, public lands, and much more.   On Tuesday, the President signed this year's massive $1.5 trillion…

  • From the field

    Future of the Yellowstone

    Winding streams, abundant wildlife, and year-round beauty. The Yellowstone River is as iconic and awe inspiring as it gets. Flowing 660 miles from its origin in Yellowstone National Park to its confluence with the Missouri River, the Yellowstone rises and falls, untamed by any dam. The river is the very essence of wildness, yet it…

  • From the President Conservation TROUT Magazine

    Caring for and recovering priority waters

    Here lies the promise of our plans to develop a shared agenda of priority waters.

    The release

    The secret sauce of Trout Unlimited is the fact that we enjoy a grassroots network of volunteers with deep roots in their communities and incredible passion for the waters they live, love and fish. Their knowledge, energy and passion are strengthened by hundreds of professional TU staff—biologists, restoration practitioners, water lawyers, organizers, and scientists. These staff are…

  • Conservation Government Affairs

    Congress needs to act on climate change to protect fishing, outdoor economy

    As I drove down to the river access, I couldn’t help but notice the expanse of sun-bleached stones signifying lower-than-usual flows.

    My dog, Cooper, gave me a plaintive stare as I loaded up the truck on a chilly May morning, the dawn light just beginning to break over the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Normally my German shorthaired pointer is a fixture on all my fishing trips, but on that day I was planning to wade the…